It’s the holiday season, and while we’re still living with uncertainty surrounding the pandemic, strides have been made. Many people who have been vaccinated are now around other people for the first time in a while. It may seem that everyone is partying and celebrating.

Most people in recovery choose to stay away from parties or events where there may be drinking or other substance use. But you may feel pressured to go to family events after a long time of not seeing them. Or you may end up at an event you thought was straight-edge, only to learn there is substance abuse taking place.

A Few Easy Ways to Say No

Saying “no” to somebody isn’t as complicated as it sounds. You may feel pressured if the question catches you by surprise. Making “excuses” isn’t necessarily healthy, so don’t feel pressured to make up a lie. Saying “no” and continuing with whatever you’re doing is a good plan.

Again – for the most part, lying isn’t worth it. If you aren’t upfront about the reason you’ve quit drinking, you may be tempted. However, being upfront doesn’t mean breaking your anonymity. Here are a few ways to reject a drink:

You may want to make an excuse or lie up if you’re with strangers, and you don’t want to divulge what’s going on. But if you’re around people you know, don’t be dishonest. Let them know you don’t drink (or smoke weed) and do not intend to any time soon. If that offends them, that’s their problem.

Think, Don’t Drink! Have A Plan

You don’t have to drink or use marijuana or any other substance if you don’t want to. However, if you’re worried about triggers at holiday events,  it’s vital to have an “exit plan,” such as planning to go to a 12-step meeting or another sober gathering.

In recovery, it’s important to keep your feet on the ground. Your safety and serenity should come first in your life. For one thing, COVID isn’t over, and it hasn’t been cured, and you may not even want to go to a party.

If you realize that you’re in a sketchy or uncomfortable situation, it’s time to THINK of your exit plan. Call your sponsor, text a friend, or let somebody else you trust that you’re having a bad time and are heading to a meeting.

Getting Help for Addiction

If you or somebody you love needs help with a substance use disorder, we’re here to help you get started on your journey. Give us a call at 760-216-2077 to learn about your options.

If you are a parent, partner, or other loved one of a person with a substance use disorder, you’re probably put in some painful situations when your loved one asks for something. You may have helped them in the past with money, paying bills, or even giving them rides to places. Yet you never quite know if they’re telling the truth and often wonder if your “help” has done more harm than good.

Loving somebody with substance use disorder can be challenging. Learning to set boundaries and say "No" can help you transform the relationship and make room to take care of your own needs.

What Happens When You Say No?

What is the worst thing that you think will happen if you tell your loved one that no? For example, what will they do if you say you cannot help them with money this week? Many parents, for example, think their child will stop calling or interacting with them if they cut off the financial support.

More often than not, your loved will keep calling and will continue to ask you for things. This is why it’s so important to have a plan on what your boundaries are, and stick with them.

You may not be willing to cut your child off completely, but setting boundaries is still essential. Let them know you love them, and you want them to get help for their substance use disorder. They can come over for dinner, but only when they are sober. You will take them shopping for groceries, but only when they are sober. You may not want to give your adult child money, but you may be okay with paying their phone bill this month, but not next month. Or you may not want to give them any help at all until they are sober.

When you say no, it’s also an opportunity to give your loved one an alternative or tell them you’ll help them with finding a 12-step meeting or detox. Let your loved one know how you can support them when they’re willing to get the help they need for substance use.

Saying No Can Be Challenging

You may have to say “No” more than once. This is because your loved one may be used to getting their way, so when you say no, they may not believe it at first.

“No” is a complete sentence; you don’t owe somebody who is asking you for something an explanation.

Sometimes, when you learn to say “No,” you may feel the anger behind the word. Getting angry, going into loud, irate explanations, or hanging up on your loved one will leave you feeling guilty. (Then you may be tempted to call them back and say, “I changed my mind.”)

Say “No,” and be polite and kind, and take a deep breath. Your loved one will have to accept that you’ve said no, and they may get upset. If you start to get angry, tell them you will call them back later. Wait until you’re calm and collected to do so.

Nobody is going to change overnight. Your loved one didn’t become addicted overnight, and they aren’t going to get sober overnight. When they first get sober, it will take a while for them to change their lifestyle and behavior. Likewise, changes in your relationship dynamic aren’t going to happen overnight, either. But by setting boundaries, you’ve already started to take care of yourself.

Practicing Self-Care

Once you’ve said "No" to your loved one, it’s time to put yourself first. Be gentle when you begin setting boundaries. Reward yourself with self-care time. This means spending at least 15 minutes a day doing something healthy that helps you unwind. This could be meditation, taking a walk, yoga, or another activity that helps relax you.

Joining a group like Al-Anon may help you learn more coping tools for living with a person with an addiction. Some people even benefit from interventions but getting help for yourself is important.

Help for Addiction

If you or somebody you love has a problem with drugs or alcohol, we’re here to help! You deserve a chance to reclaim your life. Learn more about your options by giving us a call.

 

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