Many people who are in recovery have experienced depression. There are many ups and downs in early recovery. For some people, depression is a mental health disorder that needs to be treated by medications, therapy, or other clinical means.

People in your life may want to help you but not know how. They may expect you to “cheer you up” on-demand or try to get you to be social when you really don’t feel up to it. If you suffer from depression, you probably want to talk about it with your support network.

In recovery, depression can feel especially isolating if you don’t share what you’re going through with others. Yet recovering from depression is important! Doing so with the help of others can be very rewarding.

Sharing About Depression With Others

All conversations must start somewhere, but you may worry about how you can kick off a chat about your mental health. In addition, you may wonder if there’s a right way or a wrong way to approach the conversation.

There’s no wrong way, really, but you can do things to help yourself feel more comfortable.

Getting The Conversation Started

Understand that you aren’t obligated to tell anyone about your depression if you’re not comfortable doing so. That includes family, friends, and 12-step support members. Likewise, you’re allowed to keep some information about your life private if you choose to.

If you feel like certain people in your life won't understand will react poorly, the best thing is to protect yourself and do what you need to help yourself.

When you’re ready to talk about your depression, here are some tips on getting the conversation started:

 

Mental Health, Depression and Addiction

Mental health disorders like depression are common among people who have experienced addiction. Many people describe substance use as a way to “self-medicate” or “feel normal.” However, when a person gets sober, they may feel the symptoms of depression or more intensely.

In treatment, you also may find you need help coping with depression or another mental health disorder. Again, this is a good thing – getting help for a mental health disorder can help you reclaim your life and feel better in general!

Getting Help for Addiction

If you or somebody you love needs help with a substance use disorder, we’re here to guide you. Many of our clients also have co-occurring disorders like depression or generalized anxiety. We can help you get the most out of recovery and make a plan for success. Get in touch!

 

When most people think of recovery from addiction, their focus is on quitting the use of drugs and alcohol. Some people adjust to life without the use of drugs pretty easily. Things get better, their emotions even out, and they’re ready to tackle a new way of living. But for people with mental health issues, it sometimes doesn’t get easier. Things may feel “off,” or they may have mood swings, anxiety attacks, or other symptoms.

Why Do People With Addiction Have Mental Health Disorders?

People who have mental health disorders are just like other people in recovery. They once used drugs to feel “okay.” When the drugs are removed, however, symptoms usually don’t just go away. People who masked a medical disorder by using drugs also won’t “get well” by simply giving up the drugs they were self-medicating with.

People with mental health issues are more likely to use drugs. Whether they know it or not, they typically use drugs or alcohol to self-medicate some of their symptoms like depression or anxiety. When these symptoms come back, they must be taken seriously and treated.

Mental Health and Drug Rehab

In treatment, you’ll be assessed regularly for symptoms of a mental health issue. If you seem to have a disorder, you’ll meet with qualified professionals. A psychiatrist or therapist can help you understand your disorder, explain the symptoms, and help you form a treatment plan.

Taking care of your health and understanding new coping mechanisms can help you a lot in recovery. If you’re on a new medication, it may take a month or so to feel any different. But once you’ve got a treatment plan in place, and start working on it, you’ll begin to feel healthier and usually happier.

Nothing changes overnight, but working towards optimum mental health is very important in recovery. If you’re struggling, reach out to the treatment staff or mental health department to get more help.

Getting Help for Addiction

Yes! We are currently still helping people get clean and sober during the COVID-19 crisis. Click here to learn more. We want to help! You’re never alone, and we want to help you reclaim your life.

Contact us at 619-363-4767 to learn more about how we can help.

 

Many people in recovery, especially from highly addictive drugs, find themselves feeling depressed from time to time. Getting clean doesn’t make life perfect, and as you adjust to life without the use of substances, you may discover new emotions pop up.

One reason that you might feel down when you’re first getting clean and sober, your body is still adjusting. Addiction changes the brain and creates chemical imbalances. These types of damage will heal over time. In the meantime, you’re left to cope with mood swings and sometimes headaches or other symptoms. Long-term recovery means healing your body, mind and spirit. For most, this means learning about self-care, learning to live by spiritual principles, and doing your best to be the person you want to be.

Coping with Depression

If you’re feeling blue, remember that this too shall pass. Here are a few great ways to kick those blue feelings to the curb:

  1. Take a walk every day. Regular exercise helps get your blood pumping and fills your brain with feel-good endorphins, the chemicals that help regulate your mood. Many people find that regular exercise helps curb stress as well as depressive symptoms. Science also shows that people who exercise regularly are more likely to have normal blood pressure and are less likely to acquire diabetes.
  2. Do something you truly enjoy. Often people just don’t take time for themselves when they first enter recovery. It’s okay, however, to take some time to do things you enjoy. Play with your dog, read a good book, or binge watch Netflix for a few hours every week.
  3. Practice self-care. Take the time to be good to yourself. Enjoy a long bath, do some yoga, or spend time in mindfulness meditations at least once a day. Self-care tasks are a great way to reward yourself and help yourself keep going on tough days.
  4. Share your feelings with others. If you’ve been feeling blue or depressed, let people in your recovery group and support system know what’s going on. They will probably have some experience to share with you.

Feeling down or blue is normal, but if you find yourself feeling depressed for weeks, or you feel like hurting yourself or others, it’s time to get help. Deppression is a real disease and many people discover they were self-medicating when they were drinking or using drugs. A qualified mental health professional, such as a psychiatrist or psychologist, can help diagnose clinical depression and help you make a plan for treating it.

Get Help for Addiction

Substance abuse disorder is a disease that needs treatment from qualified healthcare professionals. If you or a loved one is struggling with substance abuse, get help. There’s no better time to reclaim your life. Call us at 1-619-363-4767 to learn more about how we can help you transform your life.

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