The holidays are always a bit stressful, aren’t they? For many people in recovery, the holidays are more than stressful; they’re upsetting or intimidating. The holiday season can cause people in recovery strife for many reasons.

Some people have trauma in their pasts that brings up issues. You may be living with mental illness and have a family that’s not quite the best at understanding it or may have even handled it in a way that caused harm. You may feel guilt and shame for the pain your addiction caused your family. You may have been a “big partier” in the past, and not feel comfortable

Whatever the reason the holidays feel difficult, you’re not alone. Nobody has a perfect family or background that makes Thanksgiving and Christmas the best time of the year. Staying clean during the holidays can sometimes require creative problem-solving. Reaching out to somebody else in recovery is always your best option if you don't know what to do.Image of a young Asian man and an older Caucasian man in Xmas sweaters

Here are four important things to try during the holidays:

  1. Have a sober buddy. Ask permission to bring them to your holiday celebrations. Your sponsor is one person you can invite, or choose somebody else who doesn’t drink who will already be there. You may have an uncle or family member that is a lot of fun but doesn’t drink like the rest of the crowd.
  2. Make a plan to check in with others in recovery. Call or text your sponsor and friends to let them know how things are going and if you’re feeling stressed. Chances are, they may be having stress too! It’s easier when you know you’re not alone.
  3. Practice mindfulness if you’re upset. You can download mindfulness meditations from most cell phone app stores. Keep your phone with you and retreat to a private area for a few minutes. You’ll be able to slow your breathing and center yourself.
  4. Go to 12-step meetings. Some 12-step meetings have “marathons” or other special times for the holidays. If you think it’s going to be a hard day, plan to go to one meeting before a holiday event, and one session after.

 

The holidays can be stressful for anyone, but people new to recovery often feel fragile this time of year. It’s natural to feel a loss, shame, guilt, hurt and other emotions, but you don’t have to get high or drink over them. Staying clean is your top priority, and it’s important to take care of yourself.

Getting Help

Are you or somebody you love struggling with addiction? Are you unsure which services you need to get started on the path to recovery? Please give us a call at (619) 393-4767 to learn more about your options.

 

 

For people in all stages of recovery, mindfulness can be an important tool for coping with stress. Stress is all around us, especially for those in early recovery. This is why mindfulness can be such a powerful tool. It requires us to take a moment to be present, and focus on things outside of ourselves.

In situations where a recovering person is tempted to get high or drunk, mindfulness can be a powerful tool that can help that person take a step back and focus on themselves and their recovery.

What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness, is a practice that helps people become aware of their mental, emotional, and physical experience in the present moment. Through mindfulness, you can choose to experience the situation without being forced to react. Mindfulness can help you create a healthy responses to stress and any impulse to numb your emotions such as anxiety or emotional pain.

This coping tool is almost the opposite of addictive behavior in one important way; it prevents you from reacting in an impulsive way, even when you’re stressed out or upset. Stepping back from reactivity can help you make healthier decision or give you the strength to pick up the phone and get help when you’re feeling vulnerable.

How to Practice Mindfulness

First of all, it’s important to realize that stress is a natural response to challenges in your life in recovery. You may have problems with your family, finances or workplace. In recovery, you often need to meet these challenges head-on. Mindfulness can help you practice self-care when things are difficult or you’re feeling overwhelmed

Mindfulness is a very simple stress reduction practices that you can practice in any time or place. One of the easiest ways to practice is by paying attention to your breath. Feel it go in and out. Take deep, long breaths. As you do this, start to pay special attention to the sounds around you, any wind, the sensation of the sun on your face, and other parts of your environment. As you do this, let go of your fear or anger, and just let yourself “be” for several minutes. By doing this, you’re able to resist the natural “fight or flight” response that the body creates with stress, and reclaim calmness and relaxation.

Recovery is a Journey

If you or somebody you love is interested in getting started with recovery, but you’re not sure what you need to do, please give us a call. We’re available at 619-363-4767. All calls are 100% confidential.

 

 

 

It wasn't their fault, I thought it couldn't happen to my parents...could they be next? She hurt her hip last year with a fall and we haven't spoken much since....we call them accidental addicts. Those family members that only needed a relief from the pain of an injury or surgery or a tooth extraction.
 
There continues to be a large "treatment gap"
in this country.
 In 2013, an estimated 22.7 million Americans (8.6
percent) needed treatment for a problem related to drugs or alcohol, but only
about 2.5 million people (0.9 percent) received treatment at a specialty
facility.
Drug use is increasing among people in their fifties and
early sixties.
 This increase is, in part, due to the aging of the baby
boomers, whose rates of illicit drug use have historically been higher than
those of previous generations.

 

The baby boomers are coming!  High rates of lifetime
illegal drug use among the baby boom generation, people born between 1946 and
1964, suggest that the number of older adults using illegal drugs will increase
in the next two decades.  In fact, it has been predicted that by the year
2020, the number of persons needing treatment for a drug abuse and
addiction will double
 among persons aged 50 or older.
FACT:  1 out of every 8 people seeking help
for substance abuse, including illegal drugs, prescription drugs and
over-the-counter drugs (OTC) is over age 50.
Coping with an increase in addiction among older adults is a
challenge that most aging people never thought they would have to face.
Neither did their families.  But, dealing with addiction among older
adults requires our immediate attention.
MYTH:  There is no point in seeking
treatment- it’s too late to change.
FACT:  Good news!  The recovery rate
for older adults in addiction treatment is as good or better than that for
younger people.
MYTH:  Older adults suffering from drug
addiction lack the inner strength to fight and overcome this disease.
REALITY:  Addiction has many possible
causes but lack of inner strength is not one of them.  Causes of addiction
include heredity, stressful events such as the death of a loved one,
retirement, health problems and reactions to medicine.
General Warning Signs of a Drug Problem with Older Adults
Caution:  Some general warning signs of drug
abuse and addiction can be seen as a normal part of the aging process or
attributed to other diseases, resulting in a missed diagnosis of the addiction. 
 
Note:  The following are specific signs of drug
abuse and addiction and less likely to be seen as a normal part of the aging
process or attributed to other diseases.

Mark Gladden is the owner of Present Moments Recovery is a Residential Treatment Center specializing in Recovery Services for the Baby Boomer generation. Our home is located in a single family home on a single family street in North County San Diego.

Present Moments detox and drug rehab center is the premier provider of comfortable and safe Addiction treatment in San Diego. Call us and get help today.

Sobriety is worth the wait, what could you accomplish with 10yrs of Sobriety?

Congratulations on your success in managing the disease of addiction for all these years Mr. Farrell, you are truly an inspiration to us all in Recovery. I believe that by working a program of recovery (12-Step, Refuge, SMART) will have us find the our ultimate goal....Peace...While I was using Drugs and Alcohol, I spent A LOT OF TIME DURING the week preparing, wondering, and setting up for the perfect buzz, the act of the shot or the smoke. In my sobriety, I estimated, with the help of a good Drug and Alcohol Therapist, I spent 30hrs a week!!! WOW...I do a lot of different things today with that much time..

Here is the post: By Sarah Hearon  April 3, 2018

Colin Farrell has checked into rehab at The Meadows in Wickenburg, Arizona, Us Weekly can confirm. A source tells Us that the actor is still clean and sought treatment voluntarily.

Celebrities Who Have Been to Rehab

“He put himself in there. It was voluntary. He was not using again, but needed to do a little reset and get things back in alignment to make sure he doesn’t use again,” the source explains, adding that Farrell checked in last week.

Celebrity Drug Confessions

Farrell, now 41, sought treatment in 2005 for his substance issues after he wrapped the film Miami Vice. The Beguiled actor opened up about his stint on The Late Late Show in 2013.
Miami Vice wrapped … and I was put on a plane and sent to rehab,” he explained at the time. “I had quite a high tolerance for various drugs for years, I thought. It accumulated to the point where I couldn’t put my foot on the brake anymore.”
The Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them star celebrated being clean for 10 years during an appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show last year.
“Congratulations, you look fantastic,” host Ellen DeGeneres said to Farrell in May 2017 after he revealed he’s been sober for a decade. “You really do, you look fantastic, and you have a birthday coming up.” (Farrell turned 41 later than month).

Stars Who Have Bared Their Souls About Their Struggles

“I love getting older,” the father of two replied. “Except getting hair in strange places and losing hair in not-so-strange places a bit. It’s kind of an aversion that’s unfavorable. I robbed that from Billy Crystal in City Slickers, for anybody that cares.”
Farrell shares 14-year-old son James with ex-girlfriend Kim Bordenave and 8-year-old son Henry with ex-girlfriend Alicia Bachleda.
Mark owns and operates Present Moments Recovery, a Residential Drug and Alcohol Rehab Center is North County San Diego with his Wife of 19.5yrs Amy. From Interventions with family members through the Sober Living aftercare program, there is room for anyone that is ready to change their life.

 

Of 'mights' and men in ALCOHOL RECOVERY

People come and go in our lives.

I’m looking at a picture from more than 10 years ago. It is a picture of two guys posing in front of my spiritual home, the South Bay Alano Club in Hermosa Beach. There’s a sort of pipe railing and a small man and a larger man are leaning on it. The large man has his arm around the small man’s shoulders. The small, gray-blond, older guy smoking a cigarette is Harry. The wide-shouldered, younger guy with dark, well-combed hair is Jay.

Both of them are dead now, but I remember them fondly. How did this picture pop up? Maybe I stuck it into a book as a bookmark. Or it was in one of my many boxes of junk. Somehow it popped up, drawing me back to memoryville.

I liked Harry a lot. He was an AA old-timer, originally from Kentucky. He said often in his soft Southern drawl, “Oh, I just get so angry,”  in a petulant way that always made me smile. He was one of my kind, angry, sarcastic and suspicious. I didn’t like many of the comments he made to me. They were usually quite cutting. But at least he was listening to what I said in meetings and felt free to comment to my face instead of behind my back. In his own way, he cared. I learned to deal with it, even use it, because he was usually right on the money. At one time, Harry helped me with some questions I had about being gay. He drawled, “Oh Doug, you wouldn’t believe how much of those kinda things go on around here.” Then he propositioned me. He was very straightforward about it. I wasn’t interested. He was slightly irked, I think. Jay was a slick, fast-talking, well-dressed man. He tried to do the AA program from what we at the Alano Club called “the half-measures room,” which contained the club’s coffee bar. The adjacent rooms were for meetings, the coffee bar was for lounging. (I remember a Pacific Region AA conference topic: “Alano Clubs: Boon to AA or Repositories of Dangerous Bar-like Behaviors.”) He spent too much time there instead of in meetings and it didn’t end well. I knew Jay’s dad, a local police detective who did calligraphy for the local cities, hand-drawing proclamations in fancy script with lots of curlicues and inked in with bright colors. His artistic dad was a policeman through and through. It must have been tough for his burly son to be gay. Later on, one of his lovers told me about his suicide. I think he just didn’t want to be a homosexual. I don’t remember or care to remember the details of his death. Harry showed up one day with an oxygen bottle and later went back to Kentucky to die close to his relatives. The cigarettes gave him emphysema, I think. I do not feel any anger over the demise of these two men. I just feel lucky to have known them. I do not feel superior to them because I have survived them.
I only know that they were friends and part of my recovery. One of them could tell you the cold hard, truth. The other couldn’t face his. No blame, no great fault there. I’m not too good at facing the truth either. They both taught me a lot about love. I am lucky that I have survived the disease of alcoholism these years and this very day.

And I still don’t know where that picture came from.

Doug G

From Present Moments Recovery Drug and Alcohol Recovery Center in North County San Diego

Thank you SIA! Thank you your courage to stay sober...in fact their are a number of celbs that have come out of the darkest to share their experience, strength and hope about their disease.  Demi LovatO owns a 30day treatment center and matthew perry will help a newcomer find a meeting, you only have to ask!!! these are the types of small steps that we in recovery are taking everyday to support our own sobriety and that of the new commer. will you join us?

http://www.eonline.com/news/793645/sia-celebrates-6-years-of-sobriety-4-other-stars-who-ve-gotten-candid-about-addiction-and-recovery 

We salute those celebrities embracing the hard path of drug rehab recovery compounded by the expectations of society, media and those financially tied to the work of these public figures. As much as the 'stint' of alcohol rehab is important, we begin a conversation to confront Hollywood, studios and management as to the importance of sustainable addiction treatment recovery and its impact on the life of those getting help. Is there an interest to personalities getting better? If there is why do we see them back so early? Why aren't there laws requiring either a specific time for attention to whats important rather than getting back to work. Is it really worth it to get back to work or is the long term risk losing a person and eliminating their contributions? We wish we had the answer, but beginning a conversation is important. Were interested in finding out your points of view, and personally at Present Moments Recovery we embrace a long term approach where work and media can take a step back and place family and a person in the forefront.

Heather, we commend you for how brave it is to take a step. May your steps after continue to attend you and we pray for a transformation and to the family after.

https://www.yahoo.com/celebrity/heather-locklear-returns-to-rehab-to-tie-up-loose-ends-regarding-certain-issues-211052630.html

www.presentmomentsrecovery.com

This is a relatively new part of the Recovery process...We are exciting to be part of it. #dontlosethismoment #feelyoungagain #health #addiction #antiaging #lovelifeagain #drugabuse

Present Moments detox and drug rehab center is the premier provider of comfortable and safe Addiction treatment in San Diego. Call us and get help today.

I saw this and it reminded me of my initial thoughts of recovery. I thought I was different, and that my problems were unique....thanks for the message!

Present Moments detox and drug rehab center is the premier provider of comfortable and safe Addiction treatment in San Diego. Call us and get help today.

People come and go in our lives.

I’m looking at a picture from more than 10 years ago. It is a picture of two guys posing in front of my spiritual home, the South Bay Alano Club in Hermosa Beach. There’s a sort of pipe railing and a small man and a larger man are leaning on it. The large man has his arm around the small man’s shoulders. The small, gray-blond, older guy smoking a cigarette is Harry. The wide-shouldered, younger guy with dark, well-combed hair is Jay.

Both of them are dead now, but I remember them fondly. How did this picture pop up? Maybe I stuck it into a book as a bookmark. Or it was in one of my many boxes of junk. Somehow it popped up, drawing me back to memoryville.
I liked Harry a lot. He was an AA old-timer, originally from Kentucky. He said often in his soft Southern drawl, “Oh, I just get so angry,”  in a petulant way that always made me smile. He was one of my kind, angry, sarcastic and suspicious.
I didn’t like many of the comments he made to me. They were usually quite cutting. But at least he was listening to what I said in meetings and felt free to comment to my face instead of behind my back. In his own way, he cared.
I learned to deal with it, even use it, because he was usually right on the money.
At one time, Harry helped me with some questions I had about being gay. He drawled, “Oh Doug, you wouldn’t believe how much of those kinda things go on around here.” Then he propositioned me. He was very straightforward about it. I wasn’t interested. He was slightly irked, I think.
Jay was a slick, fast-talking, well-dressed man. He tried to do the AA program from what we at the Alano Club called “the half-measures room,” which contained the club’s coffee bar. The adjacent rooms were for meetings, the coffee bar was for lounging.
(I remember a Pacific Region AA conference topic: “Alano Clubs: Boon to AA or Repositories of Dangerous Bar-like Behaviors.”)
He spent too much time there instead of in meetings and it didn’t end well.
I knew Jay’s dad, a local police detective who did calligraphy for the local cities, hand-drawing proclamations in fancy script with lots of curlicues and inked in with bright colors. His artistic dad was a policeman through and through. It must have been tough for his burly son to be gay.
Later on, one of his lovers told me about his suicide. I think he just didn’t want to be a homosexual. I don’t remember or care to remember the details of his death.
Harry showed up one day with an oxygen bottle and later went back to Kentucky to die close to his relatives. The cigarettes gave him emphysema, I think.
I do not feel any anger over the demise of these two men. I just feel lucky to have known them. I do not feel superior to them because I have survived them.
I only know that they were friends and part of my recovery. One of them could tell you the cold hard, truth. The other couldn’t face his. No blame, no great fault there. I’m not too good at facing the truth either. They both taught me a lot about love.
I am lucky that I have survived the disease of alcoholism these years and this very day.
And I still don’t know where that picture came from.
Doug G
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